Category Archives: Apple

Apple sues Qualcomm for $1 billion over excessive royalties

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The news just keeps on getting worse for Qualcomm this week. A couple of days ago the FTC filed a lawsuit against the chip maker alleging that it has engaged in unfair patent licensing practices, and today it’s Apple’s turn to sue Qualcomm.

Apple’s lawsuit has to do with what it claims are excessive royalties charged by Qualcomm for use of basic cellular standards that it contributed to developing in the past.

Furthermore, Apple says that once it began cooperating with South Korean authorities in their antitrust investigation of Qualcomm, the chip maker withheld $1 billion in retaliation. Here’s Apple’s full statement on the matter:

For many years Qualcomm has unfairly insisted on charging royalties for technologies they have nothing to do with. The more Apple innovates with unique features such as TouchID, advanced displays, and cameras, to name just a few, the more money Qualcomm collects for no reason and the more expensive it becomes for Apple to fund these innovations. Qualcomm built its business on older, legacy, standards but reinforces its dominance through exclusionary tactics and excessive royalties. Despite being just one of over a dozen companies who contributed to basic cellular standards, Qualcomm insists on charging Apple at least five times more in payments than all the other cellular patent licensors we have agreements with combined.To protect this business scheme Qualcomm has taken increasingly radical steps, most recently withholding nearly $1B in payments from Apple as retaliation for responding truthfully to law enforcement agencies investigating them.

Apple believes deeply in innovation and we have always been willing to pay fair and reasonable rates for patents we use. We are extremely disappointed in the way Qualcomm is conducting its business with us and unfortunately after years of disagreement over what constitutes a fair and reasonable royalty we have no choice left but to turn to the courts.

Apple wants roughly $1 billion from Qualcomm as compensation for this behavior. Qualcomm hasn’t yet commented on Apple’s allegations and lawsuit.

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New schematics hint the iPhone 7 will be shorter, narrower and just a bit chubbier

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Only one thing seems to be certain about the next iPhone- its Fall release and we are only going by historical data here. As per the rest of the device, it is still largely a mystery in typical Cupertino fashion. Don’t get us wrong, there are leaks and rumors, plenty of them, but most sources seem to be speculating more than anything else.

Alleged iPhone 7 vs iPhone 6s comparison schematics Alleged iPhone 7 vs iPhone 6s comparison schematics Alleged iPhone 7 vs iPhone 6s comparison schematics
Alleged iPhone 7 vs iPhone 6s comparison schematics

Still, it is up to you to decide on authenticity for yourself and with that being said, today brings about a fresh set of schematics. These seem to show a detailed comparison between the current iPhone 6s and the iPhone 7. The bottom line is that the new device should be just a bit thicker at 7.15mm (vs 7.1mm), but it will be both shorter and narrower, while preserving the same screen size.

A quick look at the back side of the schematics also clearly shows a new and quite bigger camera module – another often discussed feature for the iPhone 7. The module itself also appears to be much closer to the edge this time around, hinting at some space redistribution on the inside. Speaking of which, Cupertino might have confirmed many fans worst fears and freed up some room by getting rid of the 3.5mm audio jack altogether. At least, that is what the bottom side of the drawings show.

The leak comes courtesy of an accessory maker, which is definitely believable as far as the schematics are concerned. However, it was also backed up by a clearly fake “live photo” of the iPhone 7. It is quite easy to spot some glaring imperfections around the bottom antenna band, that has been edited out, as well as the oddly missing numbers underneath the iPhone text near the bottom. Here is the picture in question, so you can judge for yourself, but overall we advise you take the information with a grain of salt.

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New Cortana for iOS update brings ability to remember things

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Microsoft has pushed out a new update to Cortana’s iOS app that bumps it to version 1.9.0 and brings along a new feature that lets the voice-controlled virtual assistant to remember things for you.

“Ask Cortana to remember things for you, like where you parked, and she’ll save it for you in your reminders,” the change-log for the update says. Aside from this, the update also includes improved feedback input experience.

To download the updated app from the App Store, head to the

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link below.

Source | Via

Slide shows iPhone 7 will have wireless charging and waterproofing

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Rumors about the iPhone are like fishermen’s stories – they grow bolder and grander as time goes on. A photo of a presentation slide lists the highlights of the upcoming phone.

The slide shows an iPhone 7 Pro (dual cameras) but is labeled iPhone 7 Plus. That aside, the phone will run iOS 10 (obviously) and will lack a headphone jack ( a rumor that has been confirmed and denied several times by unofficial sources).

It will allegedly have wireless charging and will be water resistant. Those are two things that Apple hasn’t touched, while they are becoming more and more common on Android phones.

This isn’t the first time we’ve heard of a waterproof iPhone 7 with wireless charging, but we’re still not ready to believe it. Next thing you know, people will start talking about a microSD slot.

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WSJ reports that the iPhone 7 will start at 32GB of base storage

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Apple has been selling iPhone with a 16GB starting base for the past several years. And of course, with no expandable storage available, users have had no choice but to be forced to pay a $100 premium for the 64GB (or 32GB storage with the iPhone 5 models) to be reasonably spaced for all their content.

While there have been rumors regarding Apple raising the base storage amount, there is a new report indirectly confirming that Apple will indeed raise the base storage to 32GB with the new iPhone 7 models incoming this September.

According to a person familiar with Apple’s iPhone plans (WSJ didn’t give any more information about the person in question) Apple will in fact, make the iPhone 7 with 32GB of internal storage. It is also said that the larger 5.5 inch version of the new iPhone will feature a dual sensor camera which will be used for post editing the depth of field and improved photo quality. While the standard 4.7 inch iPhone 7 will not be getting the same dual lens setup, it will still get an improved camera sensor.

iPhone 7 renders

There are also speculations about two different storage ranges between the standard 4.7 inch models and 5.5 inch Plus models. It is said that the standard models will be structured as follows: 32GB/64GB/256GB and the Plus models will be available in 32GB/128GB/256GB storage configurations with only the storage amount being the differing factors.

As well, the WSJ reports that the iPhone 7 will not sport a headphone jack, contradictingreports of alleged iPhone 7 parts which were leaked to the internet.

There have also been rumored price hikes which could very well explain the increased storage options.

The WSJ says that once June rolls around, it’s about the worst time to buy an iPhone, urging Apple fans to wait until the next model comes out.

Source | Via

iPhone 7 and 7 Pro photographed with camera humps

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Apple has gone camel on its iPhones – the cameras have humps! The iPhone 7 camera protrudes from the back as does the dual camera on the iPhone 7 Pro.

iPhone 7 another iPhone 7 iPhone 7 Pro
iPhone 7 • another iPhone 7 • iPhone 7 Pro

It’s difficult to judge just how thick the hump is from a photo, but one thing is for sure – it’s a lot bigger than current iPhones have. it seems to line up with a protective case, so we’re maybe looking at a millimeter.

Another iPhone 7 shell was shot from a different angle – the bottom – and there are no less than three interesting things to note.

First off, the 3.5mm headphone plug is gone. Maybe it moved to the top (there’s no photo of that), maybe the Lightning port is the new destination for wired headphones. The other photo of iPhone 7’s camera hump came with assurance that the 3.5mm jack is still on board (but there was no photo evidence to back that up).

The underside of the iPhone 7 shows no 3.5mm jack, a second speaker instead
The underside of the iPhone 7 shows no 3.5mm jack, a second speaker instead

Also, there are two speaker grills. Maybe one of them is decorative, but maybe, just maybe, Apple finally decided to make the jump to stereo speakers (even if they are down-firing).

And then there are the antenna lines, a thick plastic line that (used to) pass through the top and the bottom. Apple clearly went through several iterations of the iPhone 7 and there’s no way to know for certain if this is what it settled on.

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iPhone 7 rear panel shows large camera bump, source insists 3.5mm jack present

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Speculation continues on the controversial subject of the next iPhone’s 3.5mm headphone jack, or rather the rumored lack thereof. In today’s episode, a source out of China states that the decades-old analog connector will remain a feature of the iPhone 7.

A single photo of an alleged back panel for the 4.7-inch future iPhone, posted on Weibo, fails to provide evidence. However, the source is the same user that leaked photos of componentsbefore, revealing the said jack. A Wall Street Journal publication from this week said the jack would be gone, citing unnamed insiders.

Allege iPhone 7 rear panel (click for full-size image)
Allege iPhone 7 rear panel (click for full-size image)

Anyway, the back panel in the photo carries a design already familiar from the multitude of leaks. The relocated antenna bands are apparently final and so is the bulkier camera module. The source postulates that a larger CMOS sensor is to blame.

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